Batangas’ Delectable Delights – Top 5 Delicacies

Don’t leave your Batangas accommodation and set off for home without tasting—or bringing home—the province’s most popular delicacies, which is listed below by area:

 

Balayan

Bagoong (fermented fish paste)

Unlike other kinds of bagoong, which are made from fermented shrimp, Balayan bagoong is made from fish, in particular, dilis (long-jawed anchovy) and galunggong (mackarel scad). Mixed into many local dishes or used as a dip, this paste is prepared by fermenting fish in salt for 4 to 6 months in earthenware jars.

 

Taal

Longganisa

A local term for sausage, it is made from coarsely ground pork and a few chunks of fat, getting a salty, garlicky flavor from its adobo marinade. Popular as breakfast fare not just at a lot of accommodation in Batangas, but also throughout the country, it is ideally eaten with rice, egg, and a vinegar dip.

 

Tapa

Another common option for your Batangas hotel breakfast would be tapa, thin slices of cured pork marinated in soy sauce, garlic, and calamansi. It is different from the usual tapa made elsewhere in the country, which primarily uses beef. Sold alongside longganisa, it is also eaten in the same way, as part of tapsilog, or tapa with itlog (egg, which is usually fried sunny-side up), and fried rice.

Lipa City

Lomi

While this noodle dish—a Filipino spin on the Chinese lo mein—can be found throughout the province, it is said that the best lomi in Batangas is still found in the city of Lipa. Made of thick egg noodles served in a thick soup, garnished with meat bits, it was said to be introduced in the 1960′s by To Kim Eng, a Chinese immigrant. It became so popular that today, a Lomi festival is held alongside the city’s founding anniversary.

Kapeng Barako

Of course, no list of Batangas delicacies would be complete without this unique blend of coffee. Made from Liberica beans, it has such a strong flavor and a pungent aroma that the term “Barako” became the slang term for a macho man. However, it also has its “soft” side because Barako is also used as a body scrub in some spa treatments. This coffee, which is also blended with Arabica or Robusta beans, is best served hot with sweet brown sugar, or as an espresso. Undoubtedly, it’s the perfect wake-up drink for those who are going on a late-night drive back home from their Batangas accommodation.

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